With the federal election this weekend, eyes will be on the Senate to see if poll frontrunners, the Labor party, will be able to win a majority in the upper house as well as the lower house. But the road to a Senate majority will not be easy for Labor even if it wins the House of Representatives. There are 76 senators, with 12 representing each state and two representing each territory. In a normal election, only half of the state senators and all of the territory senators are put up for election. On May 18, 40 of the 76 total senators are up for election. To control the Senate, a party would have to win 39 of the 76 seats. As it stands, the Coalition has 31 seats and Labor has 26. In 2016, a Senate double dissolution was called, which meant all 76 senators were up for election. Half of the state senators – the six who topped the votes in each state – were awarded six-year terms, while the following six were given three-year terms. As a result, most of the major party senators in NSW – three Liberal and three Labor – will retain their position and are not up for re-election until 2022. The incumbent NSW senators whose seats will be contested include One Nation, the Liberal Democ...